FROM THE BLOG

Rescuing baby elephants

During the Covid lockdown, I helped Save the Elephants rescue two baby elephants in Northern Kenya. The first, Bule, was found by locals wandering on the main road near Archer’s Post. She was extremely vocal and strong, even trying to knock me over in the process! The second, Lomunyak (Lucky in Samburu) was not in such great shape. Rescued from the croc-infested Ewaso river by staff at Elephant Watch Camp, Lomunyak was covered in cuts and bites which we assume were from a lion attack. Both babies were taken to Reteti Elephant Sanctuary in the remote Mathews Rangers in Namunyak[…]

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Collaring a giant elephant

Earlier this month, Save the Elephants fitted a satellite tracking collar on one of my favourite bulls – a giant of an elephant called Miguna Miguna. I have photographed many elephant collarings during my time in Kenya but this one was particularly special. Miguna is an interesting elephant. A dominant 38 year old bull, he visits Samburu National Reserve in Northern Kenya about once every 2-3 years to look for females. He’s one of only a few large bulls left as most were killed for their ivory. ⁣⁣Collaring a giant of Miguna’s size is not an easy feat and can[…]

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Africa Geographic Photographic competition of the Year 2019

I’m delighted to announce that four of my photographs have been chosen for the Africa Geographic Photographic Competition of the Year, 2019. Three – impalas staring through the dust in Samburu National Reserve, flamingos in Namibia and Samburu woman, Mpayon with camel – were chosen in the weekly selection. My ‘Blue Steel’ leopard – also photographed in Samburu National Reserve – made it into the Instagram competition. Voting and judging closes April 30, 2019

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Lost baby elephant wanders into research camp

The team at Save the Elephants’ research centre in northern Kenya got the surprise of their life when a lost baby elephant walked into the middle of their camp recently. The team are used to monitoring and occasionally rescuing wild elephants in the field but this was the first time an elephant had ever approached them for help! The 300kg baby’s unannounced visit came just thirty minutes after a nearby tourist facility, Samburu Lodge, reported seeing a small calf alone on the river bank. STE immediately dispatched a team to investigate. While the team were still in the field, a[…]

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The Land Of A Thousand Hills: Rwanda in Black and White

Some of my favourite photos taken during my trip to Rwanda in 2017 to see the endangered mountain gorillas … (main image: This gorilla structure is located at the site of Kwita Izina -a centuries old Rwandan tradition for giving a name to a new born baby gorilla. The structure was blown over in a storm but has since been rebuilt.)   Innocence – this tiny fluffy baby would wander up and stare intently  SaveSaveSaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave SaveSave

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Travelling on the Lunatic Express

In May last year, the colonial-era metre-gauge Lunatic Express sleeper train from Nairobi to Mombasa, which used to last anything from 16 – 24 hours, ended. It was replaced by a new fast standard-gauge line (SGR) taking only four hours and 30 minutes. I’ve yet to travel on the new line but needless  to say, travelling on the Lunatic Express (that really was its name) is an adventure I’ll never forget. The train travelled through the middle of the most expansive slums I’ve ever seen and cut a swathe through acres of new development where the remains of villages clung[…]

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Gorillas in the Mist, Rain and Hail

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund. It’s been fifty years since Dian Fossey began her ground-breaking work to study and protect gorillas in Rwanda high up in the misty Virunga mountains. There she lived for 17 years deep in the jungle studying and monitoring the behaviour and movements of gorillas until her brutal unsolved murder in September 1985. I’ve always been fascinated by the story of Dian Fossey and still remember the first ever Nat Geo cover of her with a gorilla. I must have been only a toddler when I first saw the[…]

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World Ranger Day

Today is World Ranger Day where we remember all those courageous men and women around the world who put their lives on the line every day to protect our natural heritage.  I’ve been fortunate to go on patrol with local rangers and to witness them in action in Samburu and to spend time with them in Rwanda during a recent trip to photograph mountain gorillas. Here are some of my images of rangers from the Nasuulu conservancy and STE’s Security Liaison officer Chris Leadismo on patrol in Buffalo Springs and of rangers who work in the Virungas in Rwanda protecting[…]

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Up close and personal with Africa’s wildlife

Some of my favourite moments as a wildlife photographer have been when I’ve been able to get as close to my subjects as possible (without getting eaten of course!) and capture their facial expressions.  There’s nothing like spending several hours just quietly observing animal behaviour on your own whether it’s a haughty leopard staring at you from a tree stump as seen in the above photograph, or a curious baby baboon hanging precariously from its mum’s fur. As long as it’s safe and I’m not too close, I’ll switch off the jeep motor, sit quietly, camera ready and wait to[…]

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