FROM THE BLOG

Fuchsia flamingos of Namibia

Having spent a month in the Namib Desert since my last post with no internet access, temperatures of 50 degrees celsius and the nearest town 200km away, I’ve got very behind in keeping my blog up to date!  In fact I have a tonne of stories and images to post including tales about baby-sitting a tiny baboon for the night, being chased by an Ostrich and searching for Hyena in Kanaan.

Firstly though, I have to share some of my favourite pictures from one of the highlights of my visit to Namibia – seeing the incredible Flamingo colonies at the lagoon in Walvis Bay near Swakopmund.

There are literally hundreds of these gorgeous but strange creatures up and down Walvis Bay – some crash landing in the mud, others moving around in gangs like ballet dancers en point or standing upside down sucking the mud frantically in search of food. Sometimes you’ll even find them balancing on each other! These hilarious comical birds are attracted to the flooded shallow salt pans and mud flats along the coast and will also migrate to Etosha during the breeding season.

They’re hard to photograph – all legs, necks and pink feathers  – but I managed to get a few shots of Greater and Lesser flamingos to share with you right here. The Greater flamingos have yellow eyes and pink beaks while the lesser look like comic book villains with bright red eyes and dark pink feathers on their heads.

An interesting fact about the Flamingos at Walvis Bay is that in 2013 they recorded the most Greater Flamingos ever – a staggering 46,000!!  I pity the poor sod who had to count them all ….

4 comments

  1. Now I see why you were so late getting back to the safari truck! This is the reason why Gabriel awarded our group only a 9½…

    Great pics, we want more!

    rgds anthony

    1. Cheers Anthony! Hope you had a safe flight back. I’m struggling with being back in London! Missing Africa big time.

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